The Adventures of a Poet for Hire

20180530_143806.jpg

By David Michael Newstead.

Everybody has to make a living and one unconventional way of doing that is to be a street poet. Intrigued by a sign reading Poet for Hire, I recently learned about one man and his typewriter on tour this summer. Our conversation is below.

David Newstead: What led you to become a poet for hire? Like how did that come about?

Odz Nens: Just very organically. I had moved to New Orleans in November and I couldn’t really make anything else work. I was right on the cusp of heading back to Chicago, cutting off all my hair, and trying to find a nine-to-five in like IT or some bullshit. Because my background is in bioengineering. But then, I somehow found my way out into the street with my typewriter. And miracle of miracles, everything worked out perfectly.

David Newstead: How long have you been doing that?

Odz Nens: Since January.

David Newstead: So, bioengineering to poetry. That’s a big change. No more nine-to-five. Is that liberating or what’s the feeling?

Odz Nens: When I was working a nine-to-five, it was relatively free, because it was in academia. As long as I just got my work done, I could pretty much set my own hours more or less. I mean, that wasn’t the official position, but that’s kind of how it worked out.

And then, there was just a lot of chaos in my life revolving around a move down to Ocean Springs, Mississippi for a year. Shit there did not work out, so I ended up moving back to Chicago. I did some consulting work for a while, but I never really did any like strict bioengineering work. My work at the University of Chicago was as a lab technician, so I was helping other people with their experiments. But seeing everything they had to go through led me to the belief that I don’t want to be running any of my own anymore.

There are startups that are doing a lot of really good work. That’s what I was trying to do in New Orleans, because the bioengineering sector is up and coming there. Because of the Tulane and Loyola campuses are together and there’s the medical district downtown, but it’s just not quite there yet. There was a company that was telling me they might hire me, but as startups go might doesn’t really go anywhere.

David Newstead: I’m going to be honest. Bioengineering sounds like a sci-fi movie and also like you’re building monsters or something.

Odz Nens: It absolutely is all of that.

David Newstead: I should have prefaced that by saying I know nothing about the subject, because I’m a humanities guy and not a science guy. So, it’s easy to have those misconceptions. But that’s what comes to mind.

Odz Nens: But it is all of that! Bioengineering is just like an umbrella term for everything going on at the fringes of life science where engineering is finally able to meet the specifications necessary to alter things on molecular and biological levels.

David Newstead: That sounds very mad scientist.

Odz Nens: Yeah. There’s a lot of really interesting work happening.

David Newstead: So, I’m not sure what I expected your answers to be, but I wasn’t expecting bioengineering.

Odz Nens: Yeah, I’m the only poet I know with a science degree. Although I do know a poet with a philosophy degree.

David Newstead: Well, that doesn’t surprise me. Since you’ve become a poet for hire, where all have you worked?

Odz Nens: I worked New Orleans. That’s where I earned my chops and New Orleans loved me for it and gave me all I needed to travel for the summer. I worked Austin. I went there for South by Southwest, which was a great fucking time. Then, I stayed there for about five weeks. Yeah, Austin likes poetry. And then, I worked Baltimore at Fells Point for a bit when I first got to the East Coast a couple weeks ago. Then, I’ve just been working D.C. New York is next. Then, Boston.

David Newstead: It’s like you’re on tour.

Odz Nens: Yeah, on tour this summer.

David Newstead: Tell me when and why you got your typewriter.

Odz Nens: Completely unrelated. I got it like seven years ago on a whim off of eBay.

David Newstead: You just saw it on eBay and you’re like I gotta have this?

Odz Nens: The really interesting question is why I chose to bring it from Chicago down to New Orleans when I moved.

David Newstead: Before you knew you’d use it? That is a good question. Also, because I have a typewriter I know they’re not light weight.

Odz Nens: Yeah, exactly. And they’re bulky. Like I don’t know why the fuck I brought it to New Orleans honestly. I don’t even know why I went to New Orleans, because I didn’t have like a job lined up. I just… I felt the call to go to New Orleans.

David Newstead: I spent some time there. Maybe you wanted something different from Chicago? New Orleans is different from Chicago.

Odz Nens: Like polar opposites. These days especially.

David Newstead: What kind of typewriter do you have?

Odz Nens: I believe the year is 1948 and it’s a Royal Quiet Deluxe.

David Newstead: Nice. So, how would you describe your writing process?

Odz Nens: Just really depends on the day. If I’m going pretty strong… I have no idea. Input one thought, the black box consumes it, and outputs a poem. But on the days where I’m slower or you know if you want to call it “struggling” or if you just want to call it engaging with the process some more.

David Newstead: Tired?

Odz Nens: Yeah, just whatever. But like you know sometimes I take a couple weeks off and then I get back into it. It’s a meditation. A person gives you an idea or an expression or a story. Then, you meditate upon that and produce something that gives them a new perspective on that story. In some ways, it’s a very brutal process and very visceral. At your fingertips, you find heaven and hell often in the same place.

David Newstead: Okay, so you get your table and typewriter set up out in the world. That’s kind of eye catching. What reactions do you get from passersby? Are people drawn in? Or how does it go?

Odz Nens: The 80/20 rule definitely applies. 80% of people don’t even notice. Like they’re engaged with their cellphones or they’re talking to people. You’d be surprised what people miss when they’re not really looking. Of the others, by and large people are supportive of the endeavor. Like I don’t get shit from people for it. Even my relations with the cops, as tenuous as this activity can be in some places, it’s just generally pretty friendly. Because they don’t see me drinking, because I don’t. So, they know I’m another set of sober eyes there just in case.

David Newstead: Most children have never seen a typewriter though. Are they especially interested in it?

Odz Nens: Kids younger than 10 who may have heard the word typewriter, but never actually looked at one, they’re really fascinated. It’s always a pleasure to have them come by and open it up and let them see how it all works. But generally, people older than 10 or 12 know what a typewriter looks like and some of them make comments. It’s really a good spread of ages. It has actually surprised me that people would still recognize what a typewriter is. Even people younger than 30.

David Newstead: Because basically that’s never really been in use anywhere for most of their lives?

Odz Nens: For any of their life really. Even in my lifetime, I was born in 1986. I only saw a typewriter in person when I was like 17 or 18 years old.

David Newstead: What kind of poems do people ask for?

Odz Nens: I mean, the topics vary from really sunny and warm to just like the darkest and most depraved. And lust and sex and violence.

David Newstead: The span of humanity?

Odz Nens: Yeah. Absolutely. In New Orleans, poets mostly set up in two places: Frenchmen Street and Royal Street. And Royal Street is a good day spot, because there’s a lot of foot traffic and it’s right off of Bourbon Street. So, people who’ve just had enough of Bourbon Street flow on down to Royal to browse all the little shops. The atmosphere there is generally very bright, very chipper. People ask for happy poems, love poems, and shit like that. And then, Frenchmen Street at night is like the alternative to Bourbon Street these days. There’s a lot of jazz clubs there. It’s pretty raunchy, but not like Bourbon Street stupid raunchy. Little more sophisticated. Little more with it. And that’s when the gloves come off, so to speak. Some of the poems we write out there are twisted.

David Newstead: What’s the most unusual request you’ve gotten from someone?

Odz Nens: So, I was set up with this other poet and this guy came by wanting a poem for both his current girlfriend and his ex-wife. A haiku for each of them. And he was meeting up with both of them that night.

David Newstead: At the same time?

Odz Nens: Yeah, they’re all friends now. He wanted to lovingly rib them both.

David Newstead: That’s a delicate balance of tones for a writer.

Odz Nens: Well, we each took one. So, the other poet took the girlfriend poem. And I took the ex-wife poem. It was a haiku and it was like: I fondly recall the ambivalent pleasure of hate-fucking you. Or something like that. I may have missed a syllable in there.

David Newstead: Wow. And they were pleased?

Odz Nens: Oh yeah, yeah. They loved it. That’s pretty close. I think I might be missing a word in there. Doesn’t seem like 5-7-5. But yeah, it gets more twisted than that for sure. That’s just a taste. People appreciate it, because people that are stopping by for poetry are usually like no bullshit people. They know what they want.

David Newstead: Do you have a favorite part of your job now?

Odz Nens: I mean, it’s always nice when people cry.

David Newstead: Tears of joy?

Odz Nens: Just whatever. It’s the highest compliment to like reach deep into somebody else with your words and pull out something. It happens often enough.

David Newstead: I know you’re getting a tour of a lot of cities, but hopefully D.C. has been a good experience in your time here.

Odz Nens: You know, it has this really jarring, off-kilter rhythm, but I have worked my way into it slowly. Dupont Circle has definitely been good to me.

David Newstead: Any other spots around D.C. that you’ve tried out?

Odz Nens: I wanted to go set up at the U.S. Capital today, but they didn’t let that happen. I don’t know who oversees the property, it might be the National Park Service, but there’s no soliciting. But the Supreme Court across the street seemed to be okay. I set up there for like 5 minutes before they came by and shooed me away.

David Newstead: So, the U.S. Capital, you weren’t even there for a minute?

Odz Nens: I got there and put my table down and they came and talked to me.

David Newstead: Instantly?

Odz Nens: Yeah. At the Supreme Court, we had a dialogue going. At first, they were okay with it. Then, they were kind of timid about it. Then, they were kind of wondering. Then, they finally told me to stop, because a superior said that they couldn’t let that happen.

David Newstead: It sounds like the Supreme Court is very deliberative even at that level.

Odz Nens: Interestingly, the Supreme Court has ruled that speech and money are equivalent, because it was the fact that I was accepting donations I think that set them off.

David Newstead: That should really have endeared you to Congress then. I’m sure Pennsylvania Avenue wouldn’t have worked out either.

Odz Nens: I set up actually in front of the Trump International Hotel in front of the Ben Franklin statue earlier today for a couple hours. But eh, nobody stopped. In general, Dupont is good. Chinatown at the Metro stop is alright. I also worked at the L’Enfant Plaza Metro. I mean, it’s always enough. I generally make at least like $60 in a day and that’s pretty much all I need to cover my expenses. There’s almost no overhead for this.

David Newstead: Apparently, in some parts of India there’s still people doing typewriter kind of work like outside courthouses and things like that. Like transcription and letter writing you know with this antiquated device that doesn’t need batteries or electricity. I guess my point is, a lot of things don’t last very long and your machine is still getting some use.

Odz Nens: You know, I trust this machine to last a while. I don’t know how true this is. But what I’ve noticed just based on looking at a lot of typewriters and other poets’ typewriters in New Orleans is that like mid-1940s and late 1940s that’s the era of the best typewriters. Because they were still all steel. Mine has weighted glass keys, good action.

David Newstead: So, my grandfather’s old typewriter is mostly metal. And that’s from the 1950s or 1960s. And then, the one I bought online is from the 1970s and that’s all plastic.

Odz Nens: The thing about plastic is like when it breaks it breaks. There’s no way to fix it. With metal, you can at least like bend it into shape. Especially as they started balancing design more toward weight to make them more portable, they made the metal thinner. They started using more plastic and those machines are just not as durable.

David Newstead: Here’s a question. Did you write for fun before you became a professional poet? Back in academia or whenever.

Odz Nens: Yeah, I’ve always written for fun. Not consistently. But I always wrote whenever it struck me. Now, the lightning follows me.

Previous Installment

My Second Typewriter

By David Michael Newstead.

“But why do you have a first typewriter?” A friend asked me.

Fair question. The first typewriter was my grandfather’s. I always thought it looked kind of cool. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work. But the second typewriter? That I just bought online. Inspired by the documentary California Typewriter, I started searching for a restored typewriter and eventually I found something to my liking. My idea was I could figure out how to fix the broken typewriter by comparing it to a functional one. In theory, at least.

There are a few differences, of course. Like for example, they aren’t the same model and don’t have the same manufacturer. My first typewriter is a Cole Steel Portable made by a West German company that went out of business in the mid-1960s. My second typewriter, on the other hand, is a Brother Deluxe 650 TR from the 1970s.

I guess I was intrigued by its retro look and bright colors. When I first saw it, the thing just stuck out to me. I bought it from a guy in Spain who (for some reason) started repairing typewriters as a hobby five years ago. Eventually, he began to sell them on Etsy and people (for some reason) enthusiastically buy them. Me, for one. It took a while to ship, but I was excited when the box finally arrived. I don’t know how to explain it exactly. It looks and feels so cool, so tactile. Maybe because it’s an unusual purchase or from a long time ago. And added bonus, because it’s from Spain, my second typewriter also has a bilingual keyboard!

Interestingly, I would go on to discover from walking around in an office supply store that Brother Industries, the Japanese company that built my new machine, is still in business – having long ago shifted its focus to making printers. Then, it dawned on me: Japan, Spain, West Germany… It seemed like every one of these machines had a story behind it like it was on some journey that kept an otherwise antiquated object from oblivion. Maybe in the end, I’m just part of this typewriter’s latest chapter, the host at its most recent destination.

Either way, I was eager to unpack my new typewriter. I looked it over for a while. I got the device setup and made some space on my desk. Now, the only thing left to do is to write something.

Previous Installment

Next Installment

Extras: Women, Technology, and Typewriters

Women, Technology, and Typewriters

David Michael Newstead.

It might sound too bizarre to put into words, but typewriters were once considered innovative. And interestingly, the story of typewriters ends up being a case study about women in technology. So to better understand issues we’re grappling with today like occupational segregation and the gender pay-gap, I thought I’d delve into this chapter of history.

Beginning in the 1880s, many women entered into the workforce for the first time through the newly created role of typist. Now as archaic as that sounds, this represented a big career opportunity compared to the limited jobs available to women at the time. Encouraged by the popular belief that women were better at typing because of their dexterity, more and more of them began working in offices of every variety where once upon a time there had been no women at all. Unfortunately, this is also where some of the worst aspects of office culture first appeared like sexual harassment and glass ceilings. And even the best opportunities for a woman sitting at a typewriter in those days only paid a third of what a man made.

Somethings didn’t change much in the ensuing years. Seven decades later, being a typist was still a remarkably common profession among women in the workforce. As one author in 1954 put it, “There are more women working at typing than at anything else; twice as many, for instance, as are selling in stores and shops and six times the number working on farms.” So for better or worse, women and typewriters share this strange historical connection.

Typewriters started to be mass produced during the Industrial Revolution. From about 1840 to 1880, an assortment of wildly different machines were created by numerous companies. Nietzsche had one. Mark Twain had one. But few of these devices were very profitable for their manufacturers. This ultimately changed when the Sholes and Glidden typewriter was released by Remington in 1874 after years of development. Newer models and plenty of competitors would follow in their footsteps, but this typewriter set the standard. Even today, your laptop’s keyboard is based on this device! Another interesting note though is that Remington is a major weapons manufacturer that needed to diversify its business after the end of the American Civil War. One of their ideas was to build typewriters.

The circuitous route from typewriters to today’s technology starts there. All the largest typewriter manufacturers would again revert to making weapons during the First and Second World Wars, including Underwood, Remington, and IBM. And it’s these lucrative government contracts that helped to establish the business connections linking military spending, office equipment, and eventually research and development. By the 1950s, for instance, Remington began developing pioneering computers like UNIVAC with notable advancements led by Navy computer scientist Grace Hopper. Meanwhile, IBM would go on to become the dominant force in technology for a generation and, by the 1970s, it gained 75 percent of the typewriter market. It’s from this point onward that the typewriter began to fade away and the computer started its ascent in our society.

This time period is noteworthy for another reason though. Just as technology had been evolving over the years, women’s professional options were beginning to change as well. So when early computer programming was relegated to the status of typing, most computer programmers were women. For example, Margaret Hamilton is famous for writing the code behind the Apollo space missions. In that era, men were more interested in hardware, while women focused on software. Bolstered by their expertise in mathematics and computer science, these women contributed to milestones like ENIAC, UNIVAC, and manned space flight.

But while working on typewriters had been gendered in one direction, computers and the culture that grew up around them soon became gendered in a radically different direction. Ads, stereotypes, and more just seemed to reinforce the idea that mainly men worked in technology. In particular, our image of a good computer programmer changed from a woman in a support role to an anti-social male genius. The difference was when this guy typed on a computer it was viewed as somehow more magical than all the typing that came before him. And as a super genius, he also expected to be paid more. By the 1980s then, the number of women entering into computer science began to drastically decline and has never recovered.

Somethings haven’t changed much in the ensuing years. The gender pay-gap persists. Sexual harassment certainly persists. And the problems facing women in the tech industry are now infamous. Overall, this reflects a consistent devaluing of women’s qualifications and contributions in the workplace. Yet as technology has become more central to our lives, the scope of these issues isn’t limited to debates on who should work in a specific industry. The problem becomes what biases and blind spots are built into tools we all use every day. Simply replacing old technology with shiny new devices won’t fix that, but changing outdated mindsets is a good place to start.

Previous Installment

Next Installment

Return of the Typewriter Inheritance

By David Michael Newstead.

In 2015, I started a blog series about repairing my grandfather’s old typewriter. The idea was to talk about my grandfather, how I got his typewriter, and my on-going struggle to repair this really cool machine. Somewhere along the way though, things got sidetracked and it’s been awhile since I featured The Typewriter Inheritance on my blog. I was still interested in the project, of course, and it’s not like I suddenly forgot about the typewriter sitting in my living room. It’s just that 2017 didn’t feel like the right time to work on stuff like that for a laundry list worth of reasons. But this year, I want to relaunch the series, redouble my efforts to repair the typewriter in question, and to write about some interesting things in the process. The good news is I’ve already begun that work. And this time, I’m going to stick with it until the end.

Previous Installment

Next Installment

ad-colesteel-1957

More Analog Extras